The Construction of the New Gunwale

The new bakalaris shown with all the ribs restored. The insets on the bakalaris are fitted and nailed to the ribs.

Salamis, March 2000.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

The next step: to paint the new bakalaris with a minium primer.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Painting the new bakalaris with a minium primer.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Painting the new bakalaris with a minium primer.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Following the completion of the bakalaris, new chokes are constructed.

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The chokes are placed under the bakalaris and between the ribs as a re-enforcement.

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The chokes fitted between the ribs.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The chokes fitted between the ribs.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Many people do not consider the use of chokes necessary. My own opinion is that, on the contrary, they substantially re-enforce the boat’s integrity.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

After the chokes are installed they are planed together with the bakalaris so that they are all flush.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

 

The next step is to fill the gaps between the ribs, the bakalaris, and the chokes. Here we used a mixture of epoxy resin and the sawdust residue from sanding of the bakalaris and the chokes.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

After the gaps are filled, the ribs, the bakalaris, and the chokes become a single unit.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Further sanding and painting with minium primer follow.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Another view of the minium priming.

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After application of the minium, a coat of Stoppani primer is applied.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

After application of the minium, a coat of Stoppani primer is applied.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Two worn planks were removed for replacement.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The new replacement plank, called astaria8 (ασταριά) already installed. It is also made from Iroko wood.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The nails of the new plank are punched in and now putty made from epoxy resin is applied.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

In parallel with the above tasks, the upper works of the boat are prepared for a new painting.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The new stringer (λούρος), also from Iroko wood, is being fitted by Dimitris Prasinos, his son Yiannis, and by Yiorgos Karayiannis.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The installation of the new stringer continues.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The stringer (λούρος) is a beam that is nailed to the top of the ribs, the bakalaris, and the chokes. It binds all these members together.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The installation of the stringer is now complete.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The nails of the new stringer are punched in and putty made from epoxy resin is applied next.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Here you can see the reconstruction progress up to this point:

1.The bakalaris in the middle, with a lighter color wood (pine).
2.The stringer on the inner side (lower in the photograph), with darker color wood (Iroko).
3.The new plank on the outer side (top of the photograph), with darker color wood (Iroko).
4.The chokes (not visible in the photograph) are located under the bakalaris.

All these wooden components bound together create a strong, solid construction. The gunwale beam will be placed over them and will be nailed to the bakalaris, the stringer, and to the plank, thus completing the final construction of the gunwale.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Preparation continues for a new painting of the upper works.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

A piece from the old stringer now has a new function! It supports the scaffolding that will be used for painting the upper works on the exterior.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiorgos Karayiannis in the shipyard’s woodshop prepares sections for the new gunwale.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Two gunwale beams are joined together with a tackle.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Two gunwale beams before their installation.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The two old anchor bowsprits are removed prior to replacement. In the meantime, preparation of the upper works for a new painting continues.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Next to the “Faneromeni” in the Koupetoris Shipyard are two interesting boats. On the right, Antonios Z, a rare gatzaos – γατζάος (traditional cargo caïque type, predominantly from the Ionian islands and western mainland Greece, now almost extinct). On the left, Ayia Varbara, a beautiful trechantiri – τρεχαντήρι (a type of fishing caïque)—that belonged to my friend Yiorgos Sougioultzis (unfortunately now deceased).

Salamis, March 2000.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The fitting of the new gunwale now begins.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiannis Prasinos prepares the tackle joint for the next beam.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The fitting and installation of the new gunwale continues.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiorgos Karayiannisis fitting another beam with a tackle joint.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiorgos Karayiannis drilling the holes for the nails that will support the gunwale.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiannis Prasinos nailing one of the gunwale beams. All the nails utilized for this were slotted and of stainless steel, imported by special order from the USA because they could not be found at that time in Greece.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

 

After nailing, the nails are punched in.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

 

The two new anchor bowsprits: construction complete, they are now fitted to the caïque’s bow prior to installation.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

 

Ntinos Gaitanios begins to paint the boat with Stoppani primer after she was prepared (minium prime, putty, etc.).

Salamis, April 2000.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The completed gunwale. In addition, the rubbing piece is added.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The final phase is to install the dowels.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Next to the “Faneromeni” in the Koupetoris Shipyard in Salamis is another remarkable caïque, the well-known perama Hellene P. She was based for many years at the island of Hydra working as a cargo carrier. Several years after her retirement, she was purchased by the The Hydra Museum Historical archive with the intention to restore her and exhibit her at the island as a floating museum. Unfortunately, despite the well-meaning efforts of the museum director, Mrs. Konstantina Adamopoulou, this goal has not yet been realized. As time marches on and the beautiful hull deteriorates, the Hellene P’s restoration may no longer be possible. Like the “Faneromeni,” this caïque was built by mastro-Yiorgis Mitilineos16 on the island of Skiathos. Her registration number is: Hydra 167. “Faneromeni’s” registration number is: Hydra .

Salamis, April 2000.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

Stoppani primer and putty have been applied to the caïque’s bottom.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The reinstalled chain plates. Edwin, “Faneromeni’s” crewman, is tightening the lines on the dead-eyes (καρπουζάκια).

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

After the dowels are planed, the gunwale is now sanded.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

An example of a gunwale join with tackle joints, now complete.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

One of the two anchor bowsprits is now ready for installation.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Mastro-Spyros Koupetoris together with Yiorgos Karayiannis reinstalls one of the davits.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The reinstalled davit. The melancholy Hellene P in the background.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Painting of the left gunwale with Stoppani primer.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

A sweet puppy, Cosma’s daughter, who loves anchors.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiorgos Karayiannis preparing the supports where the life-line posts will be installed.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Yiorgos Karayiannis, mastro-Spyros Koupetoris, and Dimitris Prasinos install the life-line posts. Edwin helping.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The life-line posts are now installed.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

All the tasks, one after the other, reach completion… The sliding ways are now in position, a good sign! We are nearing the end.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The propeller and the shaft are painted with a special undercoat.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Nikitas Prasinos fitting the protective copper sheeting (πάφιλας) to the bow.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Last-minute applications of putty.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The fever is rising… Mastro-Pandelis together with Nikitas Prasinos is completing the installation of the copper protective sheet (pafila - πάφιλα) with Edwin’s help. Mastro-Lefteris Gaitanos with his son Ntinos and their helper are applying the last strokes of paint.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

The caïque is now on sliding ways. The whole gunwale reconstruction project has been successfully completed.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

Naxos has already boarded on the caïque is anxiously waiting for her to be launched.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

 

 

“Faneromeni” is back in the water and very happy!!!

Salamis, April 2000.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)