George Mytilineos

In 1991 I sailed with “Faneromeni” to the island of Skiathos in order to uncover her origin. I was aware, of course, that George Mytilineos, who built her, had passed away many years ago. Nevertheless, I had hopes of discovering some information about her.

As soon as I moored in the harbor of Skiathos, a man-he was not very old-approached and told me that he recognized “Faneromeni” because she was built by his uncle, Mastro George Mytilineos, in 1945. He himself was an apprentice to his uncle at that time and had actually worked on the “Faneromeni”.

He also remembered that the boat had been built to order for someone from the village of Ayios Ioannis in Pelio named Fanouris. In addition, he told me that his uncle’s shipyard was still in existence near the edge of the harbor but it was no longer a shipyard: it was a restaurant named Carnayio.

The bay of Skiathos harbor in a photograph contemporary to “Faneromeni’s” construction. At the extreme left of the picture a small building can be seen. That was the yard of Mastro George Mytilineos who built “Faneromeni” in 1945.

(Archive of the Mytilineos family)

 

 

The yard of Mastro George Mytilineos as it is today, converted to a restaurant named Carnayio.
Skiathos, May 1991.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)



We actually visited the restaurant together. The only reminder of the Mytilineos’ shipyard is the display of old shipwright’s tools on one of the walls.

The yard of Mastro George Mytilineos as it is today, converted to a restaurant named Carnayio.
Skiathos, May 1991.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)

I was saddened by this.
After the nephew showed me the restaurant, he told me that two of Mastro George Mytilineos’ sisters were still alive. I expressed my desire to visit them. 
 

Indeed we were soon at their house, a short distance from the harbor. It is a nice old stone house, not too big, near the sea, and with a good view of the bay.

The house of Mastro George Mytilineos. When I visited, the house was inhabited by his two sisters.

Skiathos, May 1991.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)


When the sisters learned from their nephew that I had arrived with the “Faneromeni” they hugged me and started crying.

They remembered well the building of “Faneromeni,” and they started telling me stories about their brother during that time.
I, too, was very moved imagining the man who built my caïque and thinking of the beginning of her life.
I spent a long time with them. They were sweet and warm ladies.

Mastro George Mytilineos’ two sisters.

Skiathos, May 1991.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)


I promised them to send them photographs of “Faneromeni” when I returned home. And I did send photos, enclosed in a letter.

Next day, when I cast off from the harbor, I sailed the caïque by their house and blew “Faneromeni’s” horn as a greeting. Immediately they came out and waved their kerchiefs and kept waving until they were no longer visible.

This was one more very emotional day that I experienced thanks to “Faneromeni”. Even today, when I think back on it, I feel moved.

One of the sisters in front of their house.
Skiathos, May 1991.

(Archive of Nikos E. Riginos)